Long Beach School District

Safe and Drug-Free Schools  
   
Title IV Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities

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   Title IV

The Safe and Drug Free Schools (Title IV, Part A) program is designed to support programs that prevent violence in and around schools; that prevent the illegal use of alcohol, tobacco and drugs; that involve parents and communities; and that are coordinated with related federal, state, school and community efforts and resources to foster a safe and drug-free learning environment that supports student academic achievement.

The purpose of the Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act (Title IV) is to support programs that prevent violence in and around schools; that prevent the illegal use of alcohol, tobacco and drugs; that involve parents and communities; and that are coordinated with related Federal, State, school and community efforts and resources to foster a safe and drug-free learning environment that supports.

LBSD Child Protection Education Program

K-2nd Grade Sample Lesson Plan

3rd, 4th and 5th Grade Sample Lesson Plan

6th, 7th and 8th Grade Sample Lesson Plan

9th, 10th, 11th and 12th Grade Sample Lesson Plan
 

 
Unsafe School Choice Option
 

 

STATE BOARD POLICY
(This policy addresses Certification of Compliance with Unsafe School Choice Option Requirements as required in the Consolidated Plan for No Child Left Behind)

1. The following definitions apply to this policy:
a. A "persistently dangerous school" is a public school other than a charter school in which the conditions during the past two school years continually exposed its students to injury from violent criminal offenses and it is:
(i) an elementary, middle or secondary public school in which a total of 20 or more violent criminal offenses were committed per 1000 students (2.0 or more per 100 students) in two consecutive school years; or
(ii) an elementary, middle or secondary public alternative school in which a total of 75 or more violent criminal offenses were committed per 1000 (7.5 or more per 100 students) in two consecutive school years; and

b. "Violent criminal offenses" are the following crimes reported in the Mississippi Student Information System:


Simple or Aggravated Assault as defined in Section 97-3-7 of the Mississippi Code Annotated 1972, as amended,
Homicide as defined in Sections 97-3-19, 97-3-27, 97-3-29, 97-3-31, 97-3-35, 97-3-37, and 97-3-47 of the Mississippi Code Annotated 1972, as amended,
Kidnapping as defined in Section 97-3-53 of the Mississippi Code Annotated 1972, as amended,
Rape as defined in Sections 97-3-65 and 97-3-71 of the Mississippi Code Annotated 1972, as amended,
Robbery as defined in Sections 97-3-73, 97-3-77 and 97-3-79 of the Mississippi Code Annotated 1972, as amended,
Sexual Battery as defined in Section 97-3-95 of the Mississippi Code Annotated 1972, as amended,
Mayhem as defined in Section 97-3-59 of the Mississippi Code Annotated 1972, as amended,
Poisoning as defined in Section 97-3-61 of the Mississippi Code Annotated 1972, as amended,
Extortion as defined in Section 97-3-82 of the Mississippi Code Annotated 1972, as amended,
Stalking as defined in Section 97-3-107 of the Mississippi Code Annotated 1972, as amended, and
Seizure and Forfeiture of Firearms as defined in Section 97-3-110 of the Mississippi Code Annotated 1972, as amended.

2. Whenever the State Board of Education has information that a school meets the criteria described in paragraph 1.a (i) or 1.a (ii), the State Board of Education shall provide the local board of education the opportunity to report on conditions in the school. After consideration of that report and consultation with a representative sample of local educational agencies, the State Board of Education shall determine whether the school is a persistently dangerous school. Once a school has been designated a persistently dangerous school, it retains that designation for at least one school year.

3. Students assigned to a school which the State Board of Education has determined to be persistently dangerous shall be allowed to attend another school in the LEA which is not designated a persistently dangerous school, provided there is such a school in the LEA which offers instruction at the student's grade level.

4. Any student who is the victim of a violent criminal offense committed against him or her while he or she was in or on the grounds of the public school that he or she attends shall be allowed to choose to attend another school in the LEA which is not designated a persistently dangerous school, provided there is such a school in the LEA which offers instruction at the student's grade level and provided the student requests transfer within 30 days of the violent criminal offense.

5. Local school systems shall establish a process for assuring any student who has the right to transfer from a school under this policy is allowed to transfer to a school in the LEA, which is not persistently dangerous. The process must be included in the system's Safe School Plan.

6. The LEA shall report each student transfer effected pursuant to this policy to the State Board of Education in the Mississippi Student Information System.
NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND (NCLB) - TITLE IX, SEC. 9532.
UNSAFE SCHOOL CHOICE OPTION

(a) UNSAFE SCHOOL CHOICE POLICY - Each State receiving funds under this Act shall establish and implement a statewide policy requiring that a student attending a persistently dangerous public elementary school or secondary school, as determined by the State in consultation with a representative sample of local educational agencies, or who becomes a victim of a violent criminal offense, as determined by State law while in or on the grounds of a public elementary school or secondary school that the student attends, be allowed to attend a safe public elementary or secondary school within the local educational agency, including a public charter school.

(b) CERTIFICATION - As a condition of receiving funds under this Act, a State shall certify in writing to the Secretary that the State is in compliance with this section.

    

Substance Abuse and Violence Education

   PRIDE Surveys:

2010 - 2011 Long Beach School District PRIDE LBMS Summary

2010 - 2011 Long Beach School District PRIDE LBHS Summary

2010 - 2011 Long Beach School District PRIDE Presentation

The Long Beach School District utilizes the PRIDE survey to fulfill the state requirement to gather local data on substance abuse in our school and community.  PRIDE  surveys have been used by schools in 49 of the 50 states and several foreign countries since 1982 to gather data on student tobacco, alcohol and illicit drug use and related behaviors. PRIDE has surveyed more than 8 million students, making the Pride Surveys' student drug use and violence survey the largest in the world. The survey is usually conducted in January/February of each year.  All PRIDE surveys are completely anonymous. 

Too Good for Drugs Program

  Mendez Too Good for Drugs K-8

 

  Mendez Too Good for Drugs and Violence High School

Long Beach students in grades K-8 participate in the Mendez program Too Good for DrugsToo Good For Drugs™ (K–8) is a school-based prevention program designed to reduce risk factors and enhance protective factors related to alcohol, tobacco and other drug (ATOD) use among students. Too Good For Drugs™ (K-8) has a separate, developmentally-appropriate curriculum for each grade level. Each curriculum builds on earlier grade levels, an instructional design which enables students to learn important skills sequentially and retain them year after year. Too Good for Drugs has been named a Model Program by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Excellence in Prevention award by the American Medical Association, Shining Star Award by the Southeastern Drug-Free Schools, First Place in Prevention by the Florida Alcohol and Drug Abuse Association/Department of Children and Families Best Practices Conference.

Students in grades 9-12 participates in the Mendez program Too Good for Drugs and Violence. Too Good for Drugs & Violence — High School is a comprehensive prevention education program for grades 9-12 designed to equip students with the knowledge, skills and attitudes they need to remain safe and drug free. This program combines components of Too Good for Violence (K–8) and Too Good for Drugs (K–8) in an innovative approach that allows high school students and schools to meet both prevention and academic needs. Too Good for Drugs has been named a Model Program by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Excellence in Prevention award by the American Medical Association, Shining Star Award by the Southeastern Drug-Free Schools, First Place in Prevention by the Florida Alcohol and Drug Abuse Association/Department of Children and Families Best Practices Conference

 

For Youth:

Above the Influence 

 

For Parents:

  Parents: The Anti-Drug

  Office of National Drug Control Policy

  Drug Facts  (ONDCP)

  American Council for Drug Education

  Partnership for a Drug-Free America

  Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA)

  Family Guide to Keeping Youth Mentally Healthy and Drug-Free (SAMHSA)

 

 

The White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), a component of the Executive Office of the President, was established by the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988. The principal purpose of ONDCP is to establish policies, priorities, and objectives for the Nation's drug control program. The goals of the program are to reduce illicit drug use, manufacturing, and trafficking, drug-related crime and violence, and drug-related health consequences. To achieve these goals, the Director of ONDCP is charged with producing the National Drug Control Strategy. The Strategy directs the Nation's anti-drug efforts and establishes a program, a budget, and guidelines for cooperation among Federal, State, and local entities.
 

ONDCP Drug Facts: Online only resources containing drug-related data from a variety of Federal studies frequently updated as new data is released. Each one is extensively cited with links to the original data whenever possible.

American Council for Drug Education:  Caring adults -- parents, family members and other caregivers -- have the best chance of helping children grow up to be drug-free. The messages parents deliver influence children, not just for today, but throughout their lives. "Facts for Parents" is designed to provide you with practical advice and up-to-date information as you broach this difficult subject.
 

The Partnership for a Drug-Free America is a nonprofit organization that unites parents, renowned scientists and communications professionals to help families raise healthy children. Best known for its research-based national public education programs, the Partnership motivates and equips parents to prevent their children from using drugs and alcohol, and to find help and treatment for family and friends in trouble. The centerpiece of this effort is an online resource center at drugfree.org, featuring interactive tools that translate the latest science and research on teen behavior, addiction and treatment into easy to understand tips and tools. Research conducted by AP and MTV recently showed that kids see their parents as heroes— at drugfree.org, parents can connect with each other, tap into expert advice for children of all ages, and find the support they want and need in their role as hero to their kids. The Partnership depends on donations from individuals, corporations, foundations and other contributors. The Partnership thanks SAG/AFTRA, the advertising industry and our media partners for their ongoing generosity.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has established a clear vision for its work -- a life in the community for everyone. To realize this vision, the Agency has sharply focused its mission on building resilience and facilitating recovery for people with or at risk for mental or substance use disorders. SAMHSA is gearing all of its resources -- programs, policies and grants -- toward that outcome.

 

A Family Guide To Keeping Youth Mentally Healthy & Drug Free is a public education Web site developed by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to communicate to parents and other caring adults about how they can help promote their child's mental health and reduce his or her risk for becoming involved with alcohol, tobacco, and illegal drugs.

 

Gulf Coast Substance Abuse Task Force
 

  Gulf Coast Substance Abuse Task Force

 

 


 

Last Modified on September 17, 2012
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